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First-Day Assignments

Before the start of each semester, this page will include information about assignments your professors would like you to complete before the first class. Please check back in the weeks leading up to the fall, spring and summer sessions.

Fall 2014

Advanced Legal Writing (Rosenberg)
All materials are either in the required textbooks or available on Blackboard.

Read: Introduction and Chapter 1 in "Writing for Practice" (Fajans), Chapter 5 in the Aspen "Handbook for Legal Writers" (Bouchoux), Michael Higdon, "From Simon Cowell to Tim Gunn: What Reality Television Can Teach Us About How to Critique Our Students’ Work Effectively" (available on Blackboard).

Exercise: Edit the student memo posted on Blackboard in the Assignments tab in the folder marked "First-Day Assignment."


Advanced Litigation (Prater)
Come to the first class.


Antitrust (Landsberg)
Read pages 1-10.


Civil Procedure (Mulligan)

  • Register for the Course’s TWEN page on Westlaw.com. (The course syllabus is there.)
  • Sept 2: In the Yeazell red text book, skim 279-87, then more carefully read 288-306, 312-14.
  • Sept 3: in the Yeazell red text book, read 315-42.

Civil Procedure (Sward)
Both sections: For Thursday, August 28, please read pages 1-27 in the casebook. A syllabus is posted on Blackboard. Please read it and note the rules governing this class. In particular, please note that laptops, tablets, phones, and other such devices may not be used in this class for any purpose. The reasons for this ban are stated in the syllabus.


Civil Rights Actions (McAllister)
For the first day (Tuesday, Sept. 2), please read pages 1-18 of the book. Be prepared to sign the seating chart. I will hand out the syllabus in class.


Commercial Law: Payment Systems (Drahozal)
For the first day of class, please read pages 1-4 of the photocopied materials.


Criminal Procedure (Wilson)
Read Chapter 1 (pages 1-17) in our textbook, "Criminal Procedure" (8th ed.). Also read Amendment IV in the U.S. Constitution (reprinted on page 923 of our text) and begin Chapter 2 by reading pages 19-29. Come ready to discuss all.


Estate Planning: Principles
For August 28 and September 4, 2014. Read pages 1-54. The syllabus is on the syllabus table outside Room 203. 


Evidence (Prater)
Read chapter 1.


Family Law (Peck)
For the first week, see the syllabus on Blackboard; read to page 19 in the casebook and read the material in the supplement shown in the syllabus through "Making own deal."


Federal Indian Law (Kronk Warner)
Getches, Wilkinson, Williams and Fletcher, "Federal Indian Law," (6th ed., West 2011), pages 1-29.


Intellectual Property (Torrance)
I'm looking forward to meeting all of you in Intellectual Property Law. Intellectual property is a wonderful subject, and we are currently living through an explosion of interest in it. In advance of the first class, please review the class syllabus to make sure you know what the assigned readings are for the first class. The syllabus is posted on Blackboard.


International Trade Law (Bhala)

Required:

  1. Pick up syllabus from tables in front of law school (by hanging files)
  2. Read syllabus carefully (Except for any questions, we will not be going over it in class)
  3. In International Trade Law: Read Preface and Chapters 1, 7
  4. Watch YouTube video

Optional:

  1. In Modern GATT Law: Read Preface, Introduction and Chapters 56-57

Islamic Law (Bhala)

Required:

  1. Pick up syllabus from tables in front of law school (by hanging files)
  2. Read syllabus carefully (except for any questions, we will not be going over it in class)
  3. In Understanding Islamic Law (Sharī‘a): Read Preface, Notes on Manuscript Preparation, Introduction: Ten Threshold Issues, and Chapters 1-3
  4. Watch YouTube video

Optional:

  1. Read Speech by President Barack H. Obama, "On a New Beginning," Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt, 4 June 2009 (attached to the syllabus)

Jurisdiction (Mulligan)

  • Register for the Course’s TWEN page on Westlaw.com. (The course syllabus is there.)
  • Sept 2: Read Pennoyer v. Neff, which is on the TWEN site.
  • Sept 3: Read International Shoe v. Washington, which is on the TWEN site.

Nonprofit and Tax-Exempt Organizations (Hopkins)
Read the first three chapters in the course book. The syllabus will be handed out in the first class.


Property (DeLaTorre)
On the first day of class, we will cover pp. 103-113 of the casebook (Cribbet, Findley, et al., 9th ed.). Please be ready to sign the seating chart on the first day of class.


Property (Kronk Warner)
John G. Sprankling and Raymond R. Coletta, "Property: A Contemporary Approach" (2d ed., West 2012), pages 1-8.


Torts I (McAllister)
For our first class session (Tuesday, September 2), please skim pages 1-6 of our casebook, and read more carefully the cases contained on pages 6-20. Be prepared to sign the seating chart.


Torts I (Westerbeke)
Prosser, Wade & Schwartz, "Torts Cases and Materials" (12th ed. 2010), pp. 1-24 (two class periods).


Torts II (Westerbeke)
Prosser, Wade & Schwartz, "Torts Cases and Materials" (12th ed. 2010), pp.864-876.


Trusts and Estates (DeLaTorre)
On the first day of class, we will cover pp. 41-50 of the casebook (Dukeminier and Sitkoff, 9th ed.). Please be ready to sign the seating chart on the first day of class.


Water Law (Peck)
For the first week, see the Syllabus on Blackboard; read the casebook pages and the materials in the supplement under the section on "Introduction," both "In General" and "Hydrology."

Questions?

Melanie Wilson
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Professor of Law
785-864-0359
mdwilson@ku.edu

Vicki Palmer
Registrar
785-864-9211
vpalmer@ku.edu

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