Student Ambassadors

Kasey Considine

Kasey Considine

2L | Boston, MA | Loyola University Maryland | considine@ku.edu

My name is Kasey Considine, and I have bounced around quite a bit in the last few years. From Boston to Baltimore, from Cambodia to China, I finally landed in Lawrence, Kan. I hail from Boston but did my undergrad at Loyola University Maryland in Baltimore, Md. I majored in writing/history with a minor in Asian studies. I studied abroad in Beijing while at Loyola Maryland, and decided that after graduation I wanted to return to explore Asia some more.

Before coming to law school, I indulged my travel dreams and taught English in Baoji, Shaanxi, China. While I was over there trying to figure out my life, I decided I wanted to combine my passion and love for all things Asian with my practical strengths in reading and writing. This is how I ended up at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kan.

What I love about KU is that it has one of the most unique and difficult-to-find dual degree programs. I am working on my J.D. and M.A. in East Asian Languages and Cultures. This is just one of a dozen dual degree programs that KU currently offers. It works for me because I can turn my love of travel and studying Asia into a career that utilizes my intellectual strengths. This means I'll be able to use my interdisciplinary degrees to expand my job search and graduate with a job that excites me, or at least pays me to travel, because I'm not quite done indulging my travel dreams.

Why KU
  • One-third of full-time faculty have written casebooks used at U.S. law schools
  • 2 KU law faculty were U.S. Supreme Court clerks
  • KU’s Project for Innocence: 28 conviction reversals since 2009
  • 7,300+ alumni live in all 50 states and 18 foreign countries
  • Routinely ranked a “best value” law school
  • 12 interdisciplinary joint degrees
  • 26th nationwide for lowest debt at graduation. — U.S. News & World Report
  • 23rd nationally among public law schools. “When Lawyers Do the Grading,”
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • 70 percent of upper-level law classes have 25 or fewer students
  • 37th: for number of law graduates who are partners at nation’s largest law firms