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U.S. Supreme Court rulings on gay rights could affect Kansas

In a 5-4 decision, the court struck down a provision of the federal Defense of Marriage Act that denies federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples.

The decision, according to Rick Levy, the J.B. Smith Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law at KU, "raises questions about the validity of the Kansas constitutional amendment."

Levy said any change to the Kansas situation would take years.

"Someone has to apply to get married and get denied so that they have legal standing, then it would go to district court," he said.

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