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Who Owns Your Genes?

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case today that could decide whether human genes can be patented.  But the case is about more than just genetics.  It’s about how medical research gets funded, who profits from it, and who has access to its benefits.  Health Reporter Bryan Thompson sat down with University of Kansas Law Professor Andrew Torrance, who specializes in biotechnology patent law, for some clarification.

Biotech Industry at Stake in Human Gene Patent Decision

An article discussing the Supreme Court's plan to rule on whether human genes can be patented featured commentary from Andrew Torrance, professor of law.

“There is a strong aversion to patents that cover any aspect of the human body,” said Andrew Torrance, who teaches patent and biodiversity law at the University of Kansas and is a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “It’s a gut-level principle. We don’t like the thought of humans as property, and we think of patents as property.”

Students represent KU in Moot Court Competition

Joining Harvard, American and Queens Universities, four School of Law graduate students will represent the University of Kansas in Geneva next month.

“It’s no more of a surprise [to see KU Law listed amongst these prestigious universities] than it should be to see Kansas Jayhawks in the final four of the NCAA tournament,” said Raj Bhala, an Associate Dean with the School of Law. “We’re a darn good law school and have a darn good international and comparative law program.”

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