Kansas into 'uncharted waters' with remap lawsuit

An Associated Press story on Kansas lawmakers' failure to redraw the state's political boundaries - forcing federal judges to intervene - featured Richard Levy, professor of law.

Hanna wrote:

Richard Levy, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Kansas, said the court's jurisdiction to draw lines derives from constitutional requirements for equal political representation.

Glitch concerning deductions lurks in new Kansas tax law

A Kansas City Star article about conflicting information on deductions in the state's newest tax bill quoted Martin Dickinson, professor of law.

Cooper wrote:

The conflict surprised lawmakers on the House tax committee and leaves some doubt about the fate of the deductions — although the Legislature clearly intended to keep them in place.

“Obviously, it’s not certain because we have this inconsistency in the statute,” said Martin Dickinson, a tax specialist at the University of Kansas who has studied the tax bill passed by the Legislature.

The small business distortion

Martin Dickinson, professor of law, was quoted in a recent Huffington Post editorial on business tax breaks.

Johnson wrote:

South Carolina lawmakers are considering a similar tax break, and earlier this year, Kansas enacted one that is even more fiscally irresponsible (and no more economically justifiable) than North Carolina's. As University of Kansas tax law professor Martin B. Dickinson wrote, the change will "shift ... the income tax burden from the wealthy and prosperous to working people."

With Income Tax Changes, Kansas And Maryland Show Their True Colors

Novack wrote:

Critics point out, however, that the new Kansas exemption is not in any way linked to the size of the business, or to job creation and covers everyone from a self-employed orthodontist or plumber to the partners of big law and accounting firms to the owners of a handful of Kansas banks organized as S corporations. “All of the law firm partners will not be paying tax. All their associates and clerical personnel will,’’ says University of Kansas Law Professor Martin B. Dickinson, an expert in tax and estate law.

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Will Overregulation In Europe Stymie Synthetic Biology?

Andrew Torrance's recent publication on synthetic biology received positive press in an online Forbes article.

Miller wrote:

Synthetic biology is only just emerging into public awareness. As it progresses, the field will present several dilemmas to both public opinion and existing legal and regulatory regimes. Two recent publications do much to introduce synthetic biology to the general public: “A synthetic biology roadmap for the UK,” from Research Councils UK; and “Planted Obsolescence: Synagriculture and the Law,” by Andrew Torrance, in the Idaho Law Review.

Brownback tax cut law produces winners and losers, KU tax law professor says

Martin Dickinson, professor of law, spoke to about 100 people at a Douglas County Democratic party meeting about the tax cuts that Republican Governor Sam Brownback signed into law.

Rothschild wrote:

Martin Dickinson, a Kansas University law professor and nationally recognized authority in tax law, said Saturday the tax cuts Gov. Sam Brownback signed into law will benefit the wealthy, produce revenue shortfalls and possibly prompt gaming of the tax system.

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